Making the Most of 1 to 1 Matching

1-to-1 match is probably one of the most important tasks a new reader can achieve. Making the connection between voice and print will help them move forward in independence and comprehension. As much as this skill seems to be obvious, the struggle is real. Students who struggle with this skill are lacking a clear concept of word or concept of print.

Teaching

One of the earliest and most important skills for emergent readers is 1-to-1 match or voice to point match. These skills need to be mastered early to ensure a steady growth in reading skills.
Teaching students to be aware of 1-to-1 match is a beginning level skill. Using early readers, students need to be able to match voice to print. Teachers might have students count the words on the page and count the words as they repeat the sentence. Once students realize the words on the page should match the words they are saying, they can begin to use decoding strategies to read more. To ensure 1-to-1 match, students can use many methods to practice 1-to-1. The picture above shows combining the poetry center with 1-to-1 practice using bingo daubers. Teachers can also use mini-erasers, flattened marbles, or highlighters to underline words. Students should be taught with single syllable words and eventually moving to multisyllabic words.

Intervention

One of the earliest and most important skills for emergent readers is 1-to-1 match or voice to point match. These skills need to be mastered early to ensure a steady growth in reading skills.
Regardless of the way 1-to-1 match was taught and practiced, some students will need targeted intervention and practice beyond the norm. Using match mats, students are directed to put their finger on each dot corresponding to each word. The mats include sight words and picture support. Students can practice reading with 1-to-1 and with confidence.

What's the Main Idea?

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.

The teachers in our school district are tasked with teaching Main Idea to our K-2 population.  Here are a few ideas for teaching main idea, but also for independent practice AFTER you have taught Main Idea.

So, I saw a poster on Pinterest...Pizza is the main idea, the ingredients are the supporting details. SOOOO...that's my picture.  Now, let's talk main idea activities.

Main Idea Sort (3 ways)

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
Using the pizza idea, I made several pictures with 4 words, students will sort the words for main idea and supporting details. Students can be directed to cut the words off the bottom of the sheet and sorting the words.  Kindergarten can even do this whole group and using beginning sound cues. Making this an independent activity AND upping the rigor, students should sort the words and add more supporting details to the list. The third activity includes writing about the sort.  Students will use the sort to write a main idea sentence and supporting details.

Interactive Notebooks Using Pictures or Texts

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.Using pictures, students glue the provided flaps and add supporting details.  This can use used as a planning tool for students writing supporting details with the provided main idea. Using short texts, students will highlight the main idea and supporting detail sentences.  Once the main idea and supporting details are highlighted, students can glue in the provided flaps.  They can write a supporting detail under each flap. Having the students dissect a passage, will help them firm up their understanding of main idea and supporting details.

You're a Teacher...Now What? Advice for New Teachers

You've got the degree and the job. You're officially a teacher...Now What? Here is some advice for new teachers.
I was so excited with my first teaching job. There was never a doubt I'd be a teacher and it was all coming true. However, my first year wasn't what I thought it was going to be. I was told the week before school started the job I thought I was going to have, wasn't going to be filled. I had to wait and see what openings would be available in that school division. I was ultimately assigned to two schools and I had to travel at lunch. I had two principals who were polar opposites of each other and were not easy to get along with. That being said, I was a teacher. Now, I'm starting year 30 of teaching and I can't imagine doing anything else. I have been a mentor to many fantastic teachers over the years, and I hope to help many more to come.

Celebrating our FREEDOM on the 4th with 4 FREEBIES!

Here are 4 Freebies to celebrate FREEdom on the 4th of July.

America celebrates her birthday
on the 4th of July.
We'll pack a picnic
and watch fireworks in the sky.

Virginia's history standards for kindergarten includes teaching about Independence Day.  It's a little more difficult to teach about Independence Day when you aren't in school in July...so, this was always my last shared reading of the year.  It is completed with a student art activity showing a skyline and fireworks overhead.

Growing up, the 4th of July meant camping and a peach cobbler.  My birthday is the 2nd of July, but we always celebrated with my extended family at a campground and a peach cobbler for dessert.

Today, it means FREE things for your students.

6 Reasons Teachers NEED the Summer OFF

There is so much talk about teachers having the summer "off." There are 6 good reasons we do...except we aren't really off.
First let me say...every teacher knows they don't have summers "off."  We do things all summer to prepare for the next year, work with curriculum, participate in professional development, teach summer school, and more. BUT, if someone out there would like to know why we need summers off and what we do in the summer, here it is.
There is so much talk about teachers having the summer "off." There are 6 good reasons we do...except we aren't really off.

Recharge.

We must recharge. I have had the conversation with my husband that being a teacher is being "on" for seven hours a day, five days a week, for 36 weeks. If you don't feel well, it doesn't matter. You can't go into an office, shut the door and do your job. If you are upset about something outside of school, it doesn't matter. Those children need you and you have a job to do. You are "on" and you are responsible for those 25 kids that day, just like every other day. Honestly, there have been days I have loved the distraction of the classroom...bring able to turn off the outside world, while turning on for students. However, at some point your battery needs recharging. You need to live for you...for a bit. My recharge is at the beach. I can breathe deeper and find me again.
There is so much talk about teachers having the summer "off." There are 6 good reasons we do...except we aren't really off.

Rearrange.

It is strange to me to think there are teachers who have the same class set up for years and years. I never had the same classroom arrangement from year to year. I was always thinking about a better way to have small group or a better place for my classroom library or a better way to set up centers. The best way to set up a classroom is to wait for the room to be all packed up and empty, then I go to town. I want to think of the a better way to make my classroom the best.
There is so much talk about teachers having the summer "off." There are 6 good reasons we do...except we aren't really off.

Re-energize.

When you get on an airplane the flight attendant asks for your attention for the emergency procedure speech. I have always thought it was ridiculous to think I would put my own mask on before taking care of a minor child in my company. It is counter-intuitive to do so. However, I completely understand the need to take care of yourself so you help those around you more effectively. The summer is a perfect time to take care of myself. I don't have to be "on" in the summer. I can allow myself downtime. I can say unequivocally I am ready for school to start back and I am ready for the year of being "on."
There is so much talk about teachers having the summer "off." There are 6 good reasons we do...except we aren't really off.

Relax.


That's right, I'm not going to deny it. There are days and weeks when I am up early, home late, and "on." It's nice to relax. I tend to be a night owl in the summer...staying up late, watching movies, reading books, and getting things done. I have stripped wallpaper (I think it's relaxing, even if no one else does), cleaned out cabinets, and leisurely walked around a mall. I have also eaten lunch at mid-day and I have gone to the bathroom when I wanted/needed to. (You can laugh, but every teacher is shaking her head and saying, "Amen.") I also tend to make doctor appointments in the summer for check-ups...sometimes it's harder to make sub plans than take the time during the school year.
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