Monday, January 13, 2014

Introductions Aren't Just for People...They are for Books, Too.

Introducing a book can make or break a small group lesson.  Make sure your introductions remind students of strategies, introduce vocabulary and support comprehension.

Hello, my name is...

Introductions are very important.  Every good guided reading lesson starts with a great introduction. Unfortunately, it can be easily overlooked and taken for granted.  I actually observed a teacher hand out books and say, "Look at the pictures quickly, so we can start reading." That was her entire introduction. Taking time to write your introduction assures you can present a meaningful introduction that supports and ensures success. There are many ways to introduce a book.  Here are four.
Introducing a book can make or break a small group lesson.  Make sure your introductions remind students of strategies, introduce vocabulary and support comprehension.

1. Vocabulary Sort

Before showing the students the book, I showed them the vocabulary words.  First, we just sorted by syllable.  After the words had been sorted, I asked for predictions.  Students had to make a prediction and add a "because" statement to the end.  "I believe this book will be about bees because 5 of the words a bee words."  "I think this story will be in a garden because that's one of the words and it's where I would find honeybees and blooms."  You can sort by known and unknown, similar meanings, characters v settings, and any other way you can think to introduce the words.
Introducing a book can make or break a small group lesson.  Make sure your introductions remind students of strategies, introduce vocabulary and support comprehension.

2. Pictionary

When possible, use a picture to help introduce words.  When introducing a story about a farm, I drew the farm on the board.  I included the settings for the book that would be necessary for success in the book.  As the students add the words to the picture, they are helping to introduce the book to themselves.  We also discovered the water in the picture COULD BE a lake, but also COULD BE a pond.  We discussed we needed to use our letter cues to determine which word is used in the story. We have to get out of the habit of telling them everything.  If they know all the answers, they don't have to use any strategies. Using this picture as a reading strategy for struggling readers is a bonus.  The picture above is the final product AFTER the students had added words to the picture.
Introducing a book can make or break a small group lesson.  Make sure your introductions remind students of strategies, introduce vocabulary and support comprehension.

3. Prediction Detective

Remember the old game show. One person gave clues about a word and the other person guesses. This is actually a great game of making predictions and drawing conclusions. Do not show them the cover of the book. Choose specific vocabulary from the story that will lead your students to draw the conclusions about the story. Write one word at a time and discuss what kind of book would have this word in it. Writing words like "seed, Sally, grow, daisy" can be a great introduction to the Rigby PM Platinum Level Reader, "Sally and the Daisy." As you add a word, ask students what the book might be about. Finally, ask for the predictions.  During the picture walk students can continue to confirm ideas about the story.
Introducing a book can make or break a small group lesson.  Make sure your introductions remind students of strategies, introduce vocabulary and support comprehension.

4. Make a Connection

At the Emergent Level, students are beginning to make personal connections to text.  One way to introduce a book is making the connection for students prior to reading the story. "One day last summer I went to Busch Gardens (or the state fair or carnival).  Have you ever been to Busch Gardens?"  Remind students there are rides at the park. Show the students the cover of the book.  "Who has been on a merry-go-round that would like to share your experiences with us?" After a student or two share their experiences, remind them to look for connections when you do the picture walk.

Do you have any ideas about Introducing a Book?  Let me know!

Pin for Later:
Introducing a book can make or break a small group lesson. Make sure your introductions remind students of strategies, introduce vocabulary and support comprehension.

No comments:

Post a Comment