Monday, September 26, 2016

6 Mini Lessons for Visual Errors

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
This is the second in the series. As I stated before, I believe in analyzing your running records.  I recently re-posted a blog about just that (Be a Reading Detective).  Once you have analyzed the running record, then what?  You have to use that analysis to make lessons for your students.
After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
Students who have visual errors are using what they see (obviously).  This can include letters (horse for house), word length (hat for hit), analogies (car looks a bit like cat).  Here are 6 ideas for lessons when students are making meaning errors.

Frame it

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
I love this one.  I use this one a lot...I mean, A LOT.  One of the most powerful things I was ever told happened to me a few years ago at the Virginia State Reading Association. Jan Richardson was the speaker and, of course, she was amazing.  She said this simple sentence, "Keep your hand out of their book."  Think about that.  "Keep your hands out of their book."  This is one of those lessons.  If you teach the students to frame a word they don't know or aren't sure of, they will isolate the letters in the words and can make good decisions about decoding.  I actually teach this strategy during new vocabulary introduction in small group instruction.  Students frame the new word to isolate it.  It helps them focus on the word.

What would you expect?

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
The is an activity uses pictures to make the students think about what they should see BEFORE they see it.  Show them a picture and ask what they should EXPECT to see in the words. The lessons can be changed to include the beginning, middle, and end of the word.  

Same Beginning Sound

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.

Teaching students to listen for the beginning sound can help them look for the beginning sound, as well.  Practicing with a target word and a variety of pictures, students can find the picture with the same beginning sound.  This will help them make good choices when using letters and sounds.

Flip the Vowel

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
This is another exercise I use when teaching decoding strategies, as well.  This is a "double your pleasure, double your fun" activity.  Students who aren't attending to the ending vowel, should practice flipping the vowel.  Using both the long and short sound for the vowel can help the student determine the correct word needed for a sentence.  

Chunking (or using Word Families)

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
Using the chunking strategies is another decoding strategy.  We call it "look for pieces you know" in decoding.  We look for the part of the word they know and build the word from there.  The activity above is "If you know...then you know."  I first heard about this from Irene Fountas at a workshop years ago.  If helps them hang an unknown on a known.  

Confused Words

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
This is actually one of my favorite games to play with readers.  You know the students who say "was" or "saw" or "had" for "has."  This game is a fun practice.  Using the sheet and a die, students roll the die and read down the column as quickly as they can. It helps them quickly decode the words that are tricky.

Don't be fooled

There is a bit of a trick, though...using the picture in book is NOT a visual error.  The picture provides meaning...so we have to remember that.  Don't be fooled by the picture.

If you would like a sample set of these activities, CLICK HERE or click the picture below.

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Wednesday, September 21, 2016

I AM...in Kindergarten

I am...in kindergarten. Introducing word wall words in a variety of activities and lessons can help students gain a working knowledge of new words.
There is so much going on in a kindergarten classroom at the beginning of the year.  There are students who are excited, scared, happy, sad, joyous, and devastated.  There are routines to learn and curriculum to be taught.  If we integrate all our lessons, it makes it all easier.

Our first week of school, we jump in head first and teach how to walk in a line, put their backpacks on the hook, find their chair, stand for the pledge, and sit for the moment of silence and that's all before 8 am.  As crazy as it is, this is the face of kindergarten.  This week we are also going to make color posters, talk about class rules, learn how to walk to the carpet, be "rug ready" and participate when asked. We are taught to raise our hand and not shout, "I'm done" a million times. We dance, we sing, we run at recess, and we get our snack ready.  AND we learn words.
I am...in kindergarten. Introducing word wall words in a variety of activities and lessons can help students gain a working knowledge of new words.
The first week we introduce three sight words: I, a, and am.  We introduce it during our Poem of the Week and put it on our word wall.  We talk about how "I" and "a" are both letters and words.  We introduce ourselves to each other, "Hello, I am Grant Collier."  We also find the words and letters in everything we do.
I am...in kindergarten. Introducing word wall words in a variety of activities and lessons can help students gain a working knowledge of new words.
Our school rules lend themselves to this perfectly.  The three rules for the school and each class are: 1. I am safe. 2. I am responsible. 3. I am respectful.  There is a class anchor chart made with the rules and pictures.  The students also make a student sample, but I don't have a picture to show you.  Friday of the first week of school our students a given directions for our first formative assessment.  This assessment includes matching colors to shapes, writing their name, and drawing a picture of themselves.
I am...in kindergarten. Introducing word wall words in a variety of activities and lessons can help students gain a working knowledge of new words.
We also make an anchor chart about good listeners.  Monday, the teacher wrote the title, "What go listeners do?"  The class has a discussion about good listeners.  Tuesday and Wednesday, the students help add words to the chart.  Thursday, students start their student-made chart by coloring the boy and adding the words.  Friday, students will order the words "I am rug ready!"  The following week, students will color and complete "I am..." sentences connecting reading with color words.
I am...in kindergarten. Introducing word wall words in a variety of activities and lessons can help students gain a working knowledge of new words.
In the following weeks, they will also use configuration boxes and sound chart pictures to write "I am a..." sentences.  This is fun.  Kindergartners think it is funny to read the sentences after they make them.  "I am a dog." brings giggles all around.

Keeping it Connected

Repetition is the best way to make words concrete. Research tells us students need exposure to a new word 14 times, but a struggling student needs exposure to a new word 44 times!  As the year progresses we will continue to circle back to words.  

If you would like the "I am rug ready." paper, CLICK HERE or click the picture below.
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Thursday, September 15, 2016

7 Mini Lessons for Meaning Errors

Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
I believe in analyzing your running records, you know that.  I recently re-posted a blog about just that (Be a Reading Detective).  Once you have analyzed the running record, then what?  You have to use that analysis to make lessons for your students.

Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
For a quick review, students who make meaning errors are not using meaning to help guide their reading.  Meaning errors are only looking at the illustrations, story meaning, the text, or their prior knowledge. Unfortunately, these errors turn into a comprehension breakdown.

What do we do?

Here are some ideas for students who are making meaning errors. 

Picture Focus
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.

Students are using the pictures, so let's make the most of this strategy.  Helping students use the picture to focus what they see, can help them make decisions about the story.  When there is a picture that could be many words (like forest and woods, in the picture above).  Help students look at the picture and name all the things it could be called, making it easier for them to recall the words when they are reading. Also, show them pictures and ask them nonsense questions. "Will I read about a lion at a swimming pool?  Will I read about a monkey in the arctic?

Sequence Activities
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.

Knowing the beginning, middle, and end of a story creates meaning.  Using picture cards the students have to order can allow students to make sense of sequencing. Putting pictures out of order can require students to either know the correct order or be able to tell why they are not in the correct order. "We can't go to the brick house in the middle of the story, the fox won't be able to blow it down and if he moves on the stick house after that.  That brother pig would be in danger."

What can it be?
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.

Students can be have fun with the "What can it be?" game. The teacher can show a little bit of a picture and then give the students clues to figure it out. Using this game is a great way to help students use what they know to help make educated decisions about the topic.  

Bubble Maps
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
Bubble maps help students build prior knowledge. Cooperatively making the bubble maps helps all students share in the combined knowledge of the group.  Before a book is introduced, making the bubble map about fall can help put language and vocabulary in their minds.  This can provide greater knowledge for students to make meaning of the story.

Semantic Gradients
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
I love semantic gradients, but anyone who knows me, knows this. This vocabulary integration helps students have a "dictionary" of synonyms to use while reading. In addition, they need to know the difference between cool and icy or the difference between big and jumbo.  Knowing these gradients, can help students make meaning choices when reading.

Context Clues
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
Lessons using context clues are good at any level.  Students will need to use what they know in the sentence or story to help make meaning choices. Using the picture above, ask students to name something that could e in the barn. Cow. Horse. Cat. Crab?  This is the prefect lesson for the "Skip and Reread" reading strategy.  Students practice reading to the end of the sentence, then rereading for meaning.

Make Connections
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
For some reason this is the "go to" strategy for many teachers. It's a great strategy, but it should be used in conjunction with other strategies.  Making connections automatically helps make the story have meaning. We've all heard of text to self, text to text, and text to world, but lately we need to make sure we are discussing text to media. Students are using laptops, iPads, and smart phones to read and learn about the world. They need to make connections with those activities, as well.

I hope these ideas can provide your students with activities for making meaning when they read.

If you'd like a FREEBIE SAMPLE SET of these activities, CLICK HERE or the picture below.

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