Monday, September 26, 2016

6 Mini Lessons for Visual Errors

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
This is the second in the series. As I stated before, I believe in analyzing your running records.  I recently re-posted a blog about just that (Be a Reading Detective).  Once you have analyzed the running record, then what?  You have to use that analysis to make lessons for your students.
After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
Students who have visual errors are using what they see (obviously).  This can include letters (horse for house), word length (hat for hit), analogies (car looks a bit like cat).  Here are 6 ideas for lessons when students are making meaning errors.

Frame it

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
I love this one.  I use this one a lot...I mean, A LOT.  One of the most powerful things I was ever told happened to me a few years ago at the Virginia State Reading Association. Jan Richardson was the speaker and, of course, she was amazing.  She said this simple sentence, "Keep your hand out of their book."  Think about that.  "Keep your hands out of their book."  This is one of those lessons.  If you teach the students to frame a word they don't know or aren't sure of, they will isolate the letters in the words and can make good decisions about decoding.  I actually teach this strategy during new vocabulary introduction in small group instruction.  Students frame the new word to isolate it.  It helps them focus on the word.

What would you expect?

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
The is an activity uses pictures to make the students think about what they should see BEFORE they see it.  Show them a picture and ask what they should EXPECT to see in the words. The lessons can be changed to include the beginning, middle, and end of the word.  

Same Beginning Sound

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.

Teaching students to listen for the beginning sound can help them look for the beginning sound, as well.  Practicing with a target word and a variety of pictures, students can find the picture with the same beginning sound.  This will help them make good choices when using letters and sounds.

Flip the Vowel

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
This is another exercise I use when teaching decoding strategies, as well.  This is a "double your pleasure, double your fun" activity.  Students who aren't attending to the ending vowel, should practice flipping the vowel.  Using both the long and short sound for the vowel can help the student determine the correct word needed for a sentence.  

Chunking (or using Word Families)

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
Using the chunking strategies is another decoding strategy.  We call it "look for pieces you know" in decoding.  We look for the part of the word they know and build the word from there.  The activity above is "If you know...then you know."  I first heard about this from Irene Fountas at a workshop years ago.  If helps them hang an unknown on a known.  

Confused Words

After analyzing a running record, giving your students what they need to imperative.  Here are 6 mini-lessons for students who have visual errors.
This is actually one of my favorite games to play with readers.  You know the students who say "was" or "saw" or "had" for "has."  This game is a fun practice.  Using the sheet and a die, students roll the die and read down the column as quickly as they can. It helps them quickly decode the words that are tricky.

Don't be fooled

There is a bit of a trick, though...using the picture in book is NOT a visual error.  The picture provides meaning...so we have to remember that.  Don't be fooled by the picture.

If you would like a sample set of these activities, CLICK HERE or click the picture below.

Pin for Later:

2 comments:

  1. Hi Cathy,
    Thanks so much for the sample set. I will add it to my toolkit. Would you check the pages for word families. The page for "ig" says "can" and so does the page for "ug."
    Thanks for sharing,
    Linda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, goodness. It has been fixed. PLEASE, download it again and enjoy!

      Delete