Thursday, September 15, 2016

7 Mini Lessons for Meaning Errors

Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
I believe in analyzing your running records, you know that.  I recently re-posted a blog about just that (Be a Reading Detective).  Once you have analyzed the running record, then what?  You have to use that analysis to make lessons for your students.

Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
For a quick review, students who make meaning errors are not using meaning to help guide their reading.  Meaning errors are only looking at the illustrations, story meaning, the text, or their prior knowledge. Unfortunately, these errors turn into a comprehension breakdown.

What do we do?

Here are some ideas for students who are making meaning errors. 

Picture Focus
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.

Students are using the pictures, so let's make the most of this strategy.  Helping students use the picture to focus what they see, can help them make decisions about the story.  When there is a picture that could be many words (like forest and woods, in the picture above).  Help students look at the picture and name all the things it could be called, making it easier for them to recall the words when they are reading. Also, show them pictures and ask them nonsense questions. "Will I read about a lion at a swimming pool?  Will I read about a monkey in the arctic?

Sequence Activities
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.

Knowing the beginning, middle, and end of a story creates meaning.  Using picture cards the students have to order can allow students to make sense of sequencing. Putting pictures out of order can require students to either know the correct order or be able to tell why they are not in the correct order. "We can't go to the brick house in the middle of the story, the fox won't be able to blow it down and if he moves on the stick house after that.  That brother pig would be in danger."

What can it be?
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.

Students can be have fun with the "What can it be?" game. The teacher can show a little bit of a picture and then give the students clues to figure it out. Using this game is a great way to help students use what they know to help make educated decisions about the topic.  

Bubble Maps
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
Bubble maps help students build prior knowledge. Cooperatively making the bubble maps helps all students share in the combined knowledge of the group.  Before a book is introduced, making the bubble map about fall can help put language and vocabulary in their minds.  This can provide greater knowledge for students to make meaning of the story.

Semantic Gradients
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
I love semantic gradients, but anyone who knows me, knows this. This vocabulary integration helps students have a "dictionary" of synonyms to use while reading. In addition, they need to know the difference between cool and icy or the difference between big and jumbo.  Knowing these gradients, can help students make meaning choices when reading.

Context Clues
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
Lessons using context clues are good at any level.  Students will need to use what they know in the sentence or story to help make meaning choices. Using the picture above, ask students to name something that could e in the barn. Cow. Horse. Cat. Crab?  This is the prefect lesson for the "Skip and Reread" reading strategy.  Students practice reading to the end of the sentence, then rereading for meaning.

Make Connections
Helping students read with meaning is the goal of any lesson. Here are 7 lessons for helping students make meaning.
For some reason this is the "go to" strategy for many teachers. It's a great strategy, but it should be used in conjunction with other strategies.  Making connections automatically helps make the story have meaning. We've all heard of text to self, text to text, and text to world, but lately we need to make sure we are discussing text to media. Students are using laptops, iPads, and smart phones to read and learn about the world. They need to make connections with those activities, as well.

I hope these ideas can provide your students with activities for making meaning when they read.

If you'd like a FREEBIE SAMPLE SET of these activities, CLICK HERE or the picture below.

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