Friday, October 14, 2016

What's the Main Idea?

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
The teachers in our school district are tasked with teaching Main Idea to our K-2 population.  Here are a few ideas for teaching main idea, but also for independent practice AFTER you have taught Main Idea.

So, I saw a poster on Pinterest...Pizza is the main idea, the ingredients are the supporting details. SOOOO...that's my picture.  Now, let's talk main idea activities.

Main Idea Sort (3 ways)

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
Using the pizza idea, I made several pictures with 4 words, students will sort the words for main idea and supporting details. Students can be directed to cut the words off the bottom of the sheet and sorting the words.  Kindergarten can even do this whole group and using beginning sound cues. Making this an independent activity AND upping the rigor, students should sort the words and add more supporting details to the list. The third activity includes writing about the sort.  Students will use the sort to write a main idea sentence and supporting details.

Interactive Notebooks Using Pictures or Texts

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.Using pictures, students glue the provided flaps and add supporting details.  This can use used as a planning tool for students writing supporting details with the provided main idea. Using short texts, students will highlight the main idea and supporting detail sentences.  Once the main idea and supporting details are highlighted, students can glue in the provided flaps.  They can write a supporting detail under each flap. Having the students dissect a passage, will help them firm up their understanding of main idea and supporting details. 

Main Idea 4 Square

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
Using a familiar format, students should already know the main idea and supporting details are the best examples of Main Idea and Supporting Details.  Providing students with open-ended 4 squares, they can choose the supporting details they want to reinforce the main idea.  Once again, this is a great springboard to writing.







Main Idea Center

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
Students can be provided a main idea basket and several apples.  Students will choose the apples that reinforce the main idea.  This independent activity is a wonderful center and a lovely seasonal display.








Main Idea Targets

Using a variety of activities can make the comprehension skill of Main Idea and Supporting Details, easy as pizza.  Here are 5 activities to help students go from whole group to independent practice.
Finally, turning the tables on main idea is a wonderful way to get students to firm their understanding of main ideas.  These targets provide 4 supporting details.  Students need to use the details to determine the main idea.  There are 12 targets in the set and a recording paper.  Students can use this in a center.  4 targets can be in a center, with a recording form for those 4 targets.  Each week for 3 weeks, different targets can be added to the center. This is an example of teaching a process and changing the product.  




If you would like a sample set of these activities, CLICK HERE or click the picture below.

If you would like the entire set, visit my TPT store or click on the picture below.
https://www.pinterest.com/pin/3799980915257783/

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Friday, October 7, 2016

Reading and Writing Strategies at Work: A Mentor Text Lesson for "Little Owl's Night"

Little Owl's night is a cute story that can be used for a fiction companion to a non-fiction story about nocturnal animals and verbs.  This story needs to be in your classroom library.
I know, I know...it's an owl book.  Couldn't help pick it up because of the cute little owl with the great big eyes.  I was delighted to find out it was not only a great little book, but it was something I could use in my lessons.
Little Owl's night is a cute story that can be used for a fiction companion to a non-fiction story about nocturnal animals and verbs.  This story needs to be in your classroom library.

Little Owl's night is a cute story that can be used for a fiction companion to a non-fiction story about nocturnal animals and verbs. This story needs to be in your classroom library.This is a cute book about owl and his friends. Although this book is obviously fiction, it is a wonderful paired passage for a non-fiction book about owls.  Students can use the provided cards to how what an animal is doing or how an animal is moving.
sort animals and make "good" predictions about which animals could be in the book.  Ask students to listen for all the things animals are doing and the ways the animals are moving in the story.  Remind them people can run, walk, swim, dance, and move in so many other ways.  Animals can, too.  Ask students to give a thumbs up when they hear
Little Owl's night is a cute story that can be used for a fiction companion to a non-fiction story about nocturnal animals and verbs.  This story needs to be in your classroom library.
During the reading, make sure you emphasize what animals are doing (sniffed, gnawed, hid, visited, sat, sang, snoring, wondered, loved, croaked, chirped) and the way animals are moving (eating, fluttered, flew, sang, rustling, gliding).  Students should be encouraged to make a thumbs up quietly so they don't interrupt the story.
Little Owl's night is a cute story that can be used for a fiction companion to a non-fiction story about nocturnal animals and verbs.  This story needs to be in your classroom library.






Little Owl's night is a cute story that can be used for a fiction companion to a non-fiction story about nocturnal animals and verbs. This story needs to be in your classroom library.
After reading, students can check their predictions for animals in the story.  They can also remind
teachers what the animals did and how they moved. You can explain things we do and how we move are called verbs.  These words tell the reader what is happening to the character. Once you have reviewed the story, students can play charades.  They can pick a card and act out what the animal did and how it moved.

If you would like the animal prediction cards and the verb charade cards, CLICK HERE or the picture below.

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