Monday, May 15, 2017

Character Traits and Character Feelings: What characters tell us?

Character Traits and Character Feelings have to be explicitly taught and practiced, so comprehension is enhanced and students can be successful readers.
This time of the year we are doing our summative F&P benchmarks. One of the most common questions is "How does the character feel when...?" AND...one of the most common responses is "happy."  Nothing can make a teacher feel any less "happy" than a student giving a quick "happy" as an answer. 

Teach Emotions

Character Traits and Character Feelings have to be explicitly taught and practiced, so comprehension is enhanced and students can be successful readers.Teaching character traits are important. We have used the chart on the right to show what traits are seen on the outside and what is on the inside, as well. BUT we can't stop there. Using this as a springboard, taking time to teach how the "inside" of the words (what he says, thinks, does, and feels) and what information we can gain from those "inside" emotions. We want to get frustrated with the students, but this is a great time to be reflective about our lessons.  I suspect we teach the difference between the outside and inside and collecting character traits, but we don't go any farther. It's one of those lessons we MUST explicitly teach. Using the words from the story, discuss the feelings from the character and what these feelings reflect in the "character" of the character in the story. Practicing this skill makes the comprehension conversation easy. 

Bear's Birthday

Character Traits and Character Feelings have to be explicitly taught and practiced, so comprehension is enhanced and students can be successful readers.One of the books I use with our intervention groups is "Bear's Birthday," a book in the LLI kit. This is an easy book to make sure we are explicitly teaching about how a character feels. We also take the time to "describe the character." My students were quick to describe Bear as big, furry, and tall. "NOOOOO, that's not what I needed. That's not what I mean.  Breathe. Think.  Reset. Next day, start over." So you know: Bear is excited about his birthday and decides to throw himself a party. He is very forgetful and needs to borrow several things from his friends (eggs for a cake, paper for hats, and balloons).  When the party is ready, none of his friends come to his house. He is sad and goes to find his friends. They are also sad because he never invited them to his party...because he is forgetful. Using this book to "describe" bear definitely provided an explicit lesson.

Emotions

Character Traits and Character Feelings have to be explicitly taught and practiced, so comprehension is enhanced and students can be successful readers.
If we don't talk about emotions on the test and only on the test, we setting ourselves up for failure. Using an emotions chart can help students distinguish between happy and excited or sad and mad. Every skill we assess should include an I do, we do, you do phase...so we have to do this with emotions, as well.

If you would like the Emotions Chart, please click the words or the pictures.
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Character Traits and Character Feelings have to be explicitly taught and practiced, so comprehension is enhanced and students can be successful readers.

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