Sounds, Abound! Charts, Charts, and More Charts

If I had to choose one thing that was the most valuable teaching tool in my classroom, I would have to say it's my sound chart. Give them tools, not excuses!
I have always used the Fountas and Pinnell Sound Chart in my classroom in a variety of ways.  I enlarged the sound chart twice for for a classroom display and cut the squares as headers for my word wall words.  I also did a blog post about printing posters at home. (That post is linked at the bottom.) I had student copies for each child at the Writing Center, at the ABC Center, in the student's writing folder, and in the student's homework folder.  It was part of our chant during morning calendar and it was our sound-linking chart for writing "what we could hear."  So I made my own.

Sound Chart ~ Small Group Options

If I had to choose one thing that was the most valuable teaching tool in my classroom, I would have to say it's my sound chart. Give them tools, not excuses!
First, I use the sound chart for quick connections in small group instruction. For my Letter Id and Pre-A students, I want automaticity with letters and sounds. I can start with each student getting a small sound chart and asking questions with Step 1 - Listen and Repeat. Quickly read a row or two with the letters and sounds. Students can echo at first, then say it with you, then say it to you. You can progress through 4 activities in Step 1, so that the students will make clear connections with letters and sounds.

At each stage students are asked to use the sound chart to move from the knowledge and recall level to the associate and synthesize level.

For a free list of 15 Sound Chart Activities for Small Group, click  the link.

 Sound Chart ~ Magnet Center

If I had to choose one thing that was the most valuable teaching tool in my classroom, I would have to say it's my sound chart. Give them tools, not excuses!
Putting Sound Charts into Independent Centers or Work Stations can create independence, and solidify alphabet knowledge. Early in the school year, students are given a bag of capital letters A-Z to match to the sound chart. In subsequent weeks, they will match lowercase letters, a combination of each and a mixture of capitals and lowercase letters. Once they have mastered matching the letters, a sound chart without letters can increase rigor and increase automaticity. The sound chart can also be cut apart and glued to sentence strips, then students can make the words with magnets.

In a previous post, I described how to make sound charts from your home printer. There is a printable version in the blog post. Click the Enlarging Classroom Posters Made Easy or the picture below to visit that post.

If you would like a copy of my Sound Chart, click the link.  If I had to choose one thing that was the most valuable teaching tool in my classroom, I would have to say it's my sound chart. Stay tuned, next week, I'll be posting about how to use the sound chart for sorting and word knowledge and MORE center ideas. See you then.

4 comments

  1. Thank you for your time making these wonderful resources to help teachers build better readers and writers!

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is just what I needed for my Pre-A friends! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete

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