Fractions for Early Learners

Fractions at the earliest level is based on equal parts and fair shares. Students can be guided through anchor charts, whole group lessons, partner work, and independent activities.
As you know, math isn't my thing...but even I can do kindergarten math. Fractions at the kindergarten level area all about understanding equal parts and fair shares. We do not talk about numeral representations of fractions and we don't label fractions as 1/2 or 1/4. We only talk about fair shares.
Thankfully, all students know when something is a fair share...so use that to your advantage.

6 Steps for Success with Sequencing

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.
I blogged about a sequencing center in 2015, but I'd like to talk about a six different steps for teaching sequence and creating success. Students can be directed through a variety of experiences moving experiences from teacher-led, teacher-directed to student-led, student-directed. As with any lesson teachers need to be direct and specific and give quick feedback. The success needs to be ensured, but the lesson needs to be interactive and practiced in a variety of ways. Here are six ways to help ensure your students succeed.

1. Anchor Charts

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led. I know I sound like a broken record, but creating an anchor chart for students is always recommended. When we a provide concrete "anchor" for the lesson, students can be directed to the anchor chart both by the teacher and independently if they need reminders of the lesson. Words on the anchor chart, such as first, then, and last, can be used a model for children during their writing or response time. As you are reading books during the year make sure to add time words, such as "initially" or "in the end." However, don't add these words too quickly. Make sure to establish routines before expanding. To see another post on Anchor Charts, click this link.

2. Whole Group Lessons and 3. Pocket Chart activities

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.
Leading students in whole group lessons helps students practice ta specific skill in a controlled situation. Using large picture cards for whole group sequencing, allows all students to focus on specific routines or vocabulary. In a whole group, students can be handed a picture with one part of a three- or four-part sequence. Teachers can tell a story using the time words first, then, last and as the students hear the sentence that is represented with their picture card they will put it on the easel or in a pocket chart. When the three or four-part story is complete students can retell the story in the correct sequence.
Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led. Like wise, as the students practice sequencing they can be put in small groups with sequencing cards and be directed to move the cards and tell the story correctly. A fun variation of this is putting 3 cards and 3 time words at 7 places around the room. In their small group, students quickly order the pictures and words. The teacher quickly rotates around the room, checking for accuracy and having quick discussions about confusions, then directing the students to mix the cards and pictures and rotate to the next station. This is a quick way to have students practice lots of sequencing in a semi-controlled setting. It's a great way to get them up and moving.

4. Independent practice

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led. Once students have been explicitly taught, the next step is independence. Students can use the exact pictures they have practiced in whole group lessons and cooperative learning activities and demonstrate independence. This activity contains pictures and a word bank for easy writing. For another literacy center idea, see my original blog post called, First, Then, Last.

5. Add Writing to the Sequence

There are many options for sequencing and writing. Students can use familiar pictures to sequence. Make sure the anchor chart is in easy view of the students and encourage new time transition words like "at first" or "finally."

6. Linking to Known Text

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led. Any time you can link a strategy to actual text, students grow more and more. However, when you can connect it to a known text, the focus can be on the skill not the reading. I love to use Nursery Rhymes to connect skills. Although children don't know nursery rhymes as much as they used to, they are easily taught and fun to learn. Using the nursery rhyme students can order the pictures. To differentiate, students can order pictures and find the corresponding text and highlight the words and time order word.

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led. I hope I've given you plenty of ideas for sequencing. If you would like a Sequencing Sample Set, click the link or the picture. I also have two Sequencing Sets in my store, including a bundle. If you would like to peak at the sets, click the link or the pictures below.
Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.









Jump Into Summer Writing

Want a quick writing ideas for summer writing. Check out this little set for all kinds of writing with a summer theme.
Summer is (almost) here. In Coastal Virginia, we have a few more weeks of distance learning and we can rest, recharge, and review the year and reinvent some lessons while we refresh others. Whew!

A few years ago I wanted something to offer my parents and students to keep them writing. BUT it needed to be easy to follow, quick activities and fun...because it's summer! I made this set. I just updated it with 2020 dates and added black and white versions of each month for easy copying.

Want a quick writing ideas for summer writing. Check out this little set for all kinds of writing with a summer theme.
I made up 3 months of activities with a weekly schedule:
CVC Sunday
Make It Monday
Topic Tuesday
Word Wall Word Wednesday
Thinking Map Thursday
Word Family Friday
Sentence Saturday

Each day can be differentiated for the needs of your students. CVC Sunday asks students to write the CVC word pictured on the date. Students  can also write more words in that family, write sentences, write a story, draw a picture, or anything else you want.

I also included a Thinking Map Example page so everyone knows what each thinking map is asking.

If you would like this set, it's FREE!

Click the link to get the Summer Writing Journal 2020 and enjoy the FREEBIE.

If you like it, share some of your summer writing with me in the fall.

Making Predictions with Early Learners

Predicting is a reading comprehension strategy all students can master. This step-by-step blog post helps with all students.
I blogged about Predicting back in April 2014, but I think it's worth talking about again.  (Click here to see the original post.)  When students can use predicting effortlessly, their comprehension can increase.  Predicting allows students to put pieces of the puzzle in front of them.

Anchor Charts

Predicting is a reading comprehension strategy all students can master. This step-by-step blog post helps with all students. From anchor charts to whole group lessons and independent activities...it's all there. Click here to see how easy this strategy can quickly be used by early learners.
I'm a fanatic about the anchor charts.  I think allowing the children to participate in making the anchor chart gives them ownership.  That being said, our school has a specific anchor chart for all our reading comprehension strategies.  We HAVE to use the same language.  In the example to the left, the teacher made a template of the anchor before introducing it to the students. Students help to make the anchor chart and then the class has buy-in and are more likely to USE the anchor chart. I also have anchor charts 4 on a page for posting in notebooks or putting on rings for comprehension strategies and anchor chart bookmarks for student use. Each day the lesson begins with referring to the anchor chart. Reread it. Look at the pictures. Make connections with the pictures. Discuss it. Have the students put it in their words.

We got this...

We got this...we made it to May in this new normal of education. We have to take care of ourselves.
Wow, me made it to May, but it wasn't easy.

The world has somehow flipped on a dime and likewise, our teaching world has also flipped. There was so much uncertainty about what teaching would look like, not only in my own city, but in the world of education. One of the best quotes I've seen is about so far is about the boats we are in. We are NOT all in the same boat, but we are all in the same storm. My boat is very different from other boats. I have no children at home I am responsible for homeschooling. I have internet and digital capabilities. I am really just responsible for me. I WILL NOT tell you how to make all of this new world to work for you. I wouldn't be so bold or so clueless.

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