6 Steps for Success with Sequencing

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.
I blogged about a sequencing center in 2015, but I'd like to talk about a six different steps for teaching sequence and creating success. Students can be directed through a variety of experiences moving experiences from teacher-led, teacher-directed to student-led, student-directed. As with any lesson teachers need to be direct and specific and give quick feedback. The success needs to be ensured, but the lesson needs to be interactive and practiced in a variety of ways. Here are six ways to help ensure your students succeed.

1. Anchor Charts

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.I know I sound like a broken record, but creating an anchor chart for students is always recommended. When we a provide concrete "anchor" for the lesson, students can be directed to the anchor chart both by the teacher and independently if they need reminders of the lesson. Words on the anchor chart, such as first, then, and last, can be used a model for children during their writing or response time. As you are reading books during the year make sure to add time words, such as "initially" or "in the end." However, don't add these words too quickly. Make sure to establish routines before expanding. To see another post on Anchor Charts, click this link.

2. Whole Group Lessons and 3. Pocket Chart activities

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.
Leading students in whole group lessons helps students practice ta specific skill in a controlled situation. Using large picture cards for whole group sequencing, allows all students to focus on specific routines or vocabulary. In a whole group, students can be handed a picture with one part of a three- or four-part sequence. Teachers can tell a story using the time words first, then, last and as the students hear the sentence that is represented with their picture card they will put it on the easel or in a pocket chart. When the three or four-part story is complete students can retell the story in the correct sequence.
Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.Like wise, as the students practice sequencing they can be put in small groups with sequencing cards and be directed to move the cards and tell the story correctly. A fun variation of this is putting 3 cards and 3 time words at 7 places around the room. In their small group, students quickly order the pictures and words. The teacher quickly rotates around the room, checking for accuracy and having quick discussions about confusions, then directing the students to mix the cards and pictures and rotate to the next station. This is a quick way to have students practice lots of sequencing in a semi-controlled setting. It's a great way to get them up and moving.

4. Independent practice

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.Once students have been explicitly taught, the next step is independence. Students can use the exact pictures they have practiced in whole group lessons and cooperative learning activities and demonstrate independence. This activity contains pictures and a word bank for easy writing. For another literacy center idea, see my original blog post called, First, Then, Last.

5. Add Writing to the Sequence

There are many options for sequencing and writing. Students can use familiar pictures to sequence. Make sure the anchor chart is in easy view of the students and encourage new time transition words like "at first" or "finally."

6. Linking to Known Text

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.Any time you can link a strategy to actual text, students grow more and more. However, when you can connect it to a known text, the focus can be on the skill not the reading. I love to use Nursery Rhymes to connect skills. Although children don't know nursery rhymes as much as they used to, they are easily taught and fun to learn. Using the nursery rhyme students can order the pictures. To differentiate, students can order pictures and find the corresponding text and highlight the words and time order word.

Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.I hope I've given you plenty of ideas for sequencing. If you would like a Sequencing Sample Set, click the link or the picture. I also have two Sequencing Sets in my store, including a bundle. If you would like to peak at the sets, click the link or the pictures below.
Here are 6 Steps for Success with Sequencing. Students are led through a variety of activities ranging from teacher directed to student led.









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